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Jammie Dodget Biscuit

The folks at Nice Sit Down and a Cup of Tea are even more biscuit geeks than I am!

Early readers of my blog might remember my Meditation on Tea post. Well, the one thing that can can make a cup of tea even better is a good biscuit.

I fancy myself as little bit of a biscuit connoisseur actually, and I think the British do biscuits rather well. Yes, America has given us the large, chewy cookie; Italy has given us the biscotti, which I don’t particularly like; but we Brits are the champions of the humble biscuit.

“What’s your favourite biscuit?” became a common question posed to the politicians who swarmed Mumsnet during the last general election. Gordon Brown’s seemingly innocent overlooking of the question might have lead to his undoing. It certainly lead to a new biscuit smiley on the site which has come to represent a passive-aggressive “no comment”. Last year, Sainsbury’s conducted a survey of people’s favourite biscuits. Inexplicably, the overall favourite was the dry and bland digestive. Readers of the Guardian apparently chose ginger and chocolate cookies as their biscuit of choice, and Sun readers like a pink wafer. While I am all for freedom of choice, I fear I may struggle to remain friend’s with someone who chooses a custard cream as their favourite biscuit.

What is my favourite you ask? Well, that’s rather a complex question. I love a good luxury biscuit, like a chocolate chip shortbread from the bakery. or our family favourite, Fox’s Shortcake Rounds. But they are more chocolate than biscuit, which perhaps defeats the object. Surely anyone would chose a lovely rich chocolatey fancy biscuit over anything else? Perhaps more revealing is the everyday biscuit barrel choice you make. In that case it would have to be a Bourbon Cream every single time. Admittedly they taste less of chocolate than you might imagine, and they, like most biscuits, can be quite dry (this was initially the point of biscuits, the word biscuit comes from the Latin words bis (twice) and coquere, coctus (to cook, cooked), and, hence, means “twice-cooked”) and therefore it is imperative that it should be dunked in a cup of tea. For even more biscuity trivia and reviews check out Nice Cup of Tea and a Sit Down

I may lose followers by revealing this questionable habit, but I couldn’t write a blog post on biscuits without giving you my ultimate biscuit tip. Make a cup of tea. Take a Twix (which for the purposes of this post I am considering a biscuit product, it’s that grey area along with the Kit Kat). Bite off each end of the Twix, then, ensuring your tea is not too hot, use the Twix to suck up the tea. Finally, carefully eat the remaining melted, soggy goodness, taking care not to drop it into your tea. This, my friends, is a Twix Fix. Your life will never be the same again.

Sadly for me, my years of eating biscuits with gay abandon have caught up with my waist line so I steer clear of the biscuit tin unless it is a very special occasion. Fortunately, biscuity appetites can be satisfied calorie free with these fantastic hand-printed biscuit cushions from Nikki McWilliams:

Nice biscuit cushion

Nice biscuits are not the Nicest but I bet they’re Nice to sit on

Tunnocks teacake cushion

I don’t care for a Tunnock’s Teacake myself, but I do love this cushion

Based in Dundee, there is a strong Tunnock’s focus to her product line, but she still pays homage to the humble bourbon.

Bourbon biscuit cushion

Not for dunking but still delectible